Exploring alloy-based protection

Will alloy-inducing anti-corrosion agents make metal blasting a thing of the past? By Merrick Alpert Metal blasting (or sandblasting) has long been a go-to process to treat metal before the application of a surface material, such as an anti-corrosive agent. But as alloy-inducing anti-corrosion agents take the stage to compete with traditional barrier coatings, surface preparation will change. To understand why, we…

Sand Casting

Sand casting is the most widely used metal casting process in manufacturing. Almost all casting metals can be sand cast. Sand castings can range in size from very small to extremely large. Some examples of items manufactured in modern industry by sand casting processes are engine blocks, machine tool bases, cylinder heads, pump housings, and valves, just to name a…

Metal Casting Process

A mold is formed into the geometric shape of a desired part. Molten metal is then poured into the mold, the mold holds this material in shape as it solidifies. A metal casting is created. Although this seems rather simple, the manufacturing process of metal casting is both a science and an art. Let's begin our study of metal casting…

Metal Mold Casting

Metal Mold Casting At least three families of molding and casting processes can be categorized as metal mold processes. These include diecasting (high-pressure diecasting), low-pressure permanent mold casting and permanent mold casting. Unlike sand casting processes, in which a mold is destroyed after pouring to remove the casting, permanent mold casting uses the mold repeatedly. Diecasting Diecasting is used to…

Advances in Aluminum: New Twists on an Old Material

From “transparency” and bubble-wrap-type material to a net-like sponge, we could very well be witnessing the Second Age of Aluminum. Aluminum in its modern form has been around for more than a century. In the 1880s, it was considered more valuable than gold, particularly because it was difficult to produce in a pure form. Ever since what is considered the First…

What are the Differences Between Various Nickel-based Metals and Alloys?

Nickel alloys are used extensively in industry due to their resistance to corrosion and ability to withstand high temperatures and pressures. Nickel alloys resist high pressures and temperatures, making them well-suited for high-performance applications such as jet-engine blades. They also resist corrosion. That’s why Monel is used in deep-seal mining, where seawater poses a constant threat of corrosion. Nickel is…

What Engineers Should Know about Zinc-Nickel Coatings

The development and practical application of electroplated zinc-nickel alloy coatings began during the 1980s, and its acceptance and use have grown slowly but consistently ever since. So Zn-Ni coatings are not as widely used as other traditional protective coatings. This is unfortunate and likely due to the fact the process and the benefits it brings are subject to some misconceptions.…

What’s the Difference Between Investment Casting and Sand Casting?

Though they have been refined through the ages, significant differences exist between the two methods used to make metal parts. Sand casting and investment casting are methods of creating metal parts by pouring molten metal into three-dimensional molds. Although methods are thousands of years old, both have been refined over the years to minimize the amount of metal used and…

Advances in Metals Pave Way to Lighter Vehicles

Higher safety and environmental regulations in the automotive industry push designers to use stronger, lower-density metals. Engineers wrangling with material technology continuously try to find the right balance of properties. However, it’s safe to say that two properties have remained constant over the years—stronger and lighter. Around the end of the last millennium, tighter regulations caused the automotive industry to…

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